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Labeling CBD-Infused Foods in Oregon

label CBD hemp oregon FDA
Start from scratch with your CBD product labels.

Since the beginning of the year, our firm has received a growing number of inquiries related to the labeling of cannabinoids (“CBD”)-infused foods. This legal issue is particularly confusing given the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) has yet to provide clear guidance for this category of products. This post aims to shed some light on the matter by addressing some of the requirements with which manufacturers and distributors of CBD-infused foods, specifically those derived from industrial hemp, must comply in Oregon.

Unlike the State of Indiana, which recently adopted the most stringent labeling rules for hemp-derived CBD products, Oregon opted to defer to the labeling rules promulgated by the FDA.

The Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (“FPL”) directs the FDA to issue regulations requiring that all “consumer commodities” be labeled to disclose net contents, identity of commodity, and the name and place of business of the products’ manufacturer, packer or distributor. Specifically, the FDA rules aim to ensure that foods sold in the United States are safe, wholesome and properly labeled.

The FDA rules provide two ways to label packages and containers:

  1. Place all label statements on the front label panel (also known as the “principal display panel” or “PDP”), which is the portion of the package label that is most likely to be seen by the consumer at the time of purchase (i.e., the front of the package or container); or
  2. Place certain statements on the PDP and others on the information panel, which is the label panel immediately to the right of the PDP, as seen by the consumer facing the product.

Although the FDA gives you the option of placing all label statements on the PDP or split them between the PDP and the information panel, you must ensure that the following label statements appear on the PDP:

  • The statement of identity or name the food as commonly known or used (e., chocolate, pasta); and
  • The net quantity statement or amount of product.

Due to the FDA’s ambiguous position on CBD, manufacturers and distributors should refrain from using the term “CBD” in their statement of identity and should favor instead the term “industrial hemp-infused.” (If you have been on Amazon lately, you will notice that everyone has moved over from the “CBD” to “industrial hemp” terminology.) Note also that the FDA rules impose strict font sizes and methods to accurately determine the weight of your product. Make sure you comply!

In addition to the statement of identity and the net quantity statement, labels will have to provide:

  • The Manufacturer/Distributor Information.
  • Ingredients List: Each ingredient must be listed in descending order of predominance (i.e., heaviest to lightest).
  • Nutrition Labeling, unless you qualify for an exemption, such as the “manufactured by small businesses” exemption which applies to companies that refrain from making nutritional claims and generate $50,000 or less in annual sales.
  • Serving Size.

Lastly, manufacturers and distributors should abstain from making any health claims in fear of being investigated by the FDA which treats products with labels containing health claims as drugs, not food (see here and here more information on this issue). Sometimes, “health claims” can be a fine line, so you should assume that the FDA is going to take a restrictive view of what you can and cannot say.

Although the FDA does not impose a pre-approval process of food labels, manufacturers and distributors of CBD-infused foods should have their labels reviewed by an attorney before they enter the market. Relying on attorneys who are well-versed on the issue of CBD law will ensures compliance with the FDA rules, but also help manufactures and distributors avoid wasting money on reprinting labels and marketing materials.

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Paul Ryan Supports Legalizing CBD and Industrial Hemp

hemp cbd paul ryan farm bill
There’s been quite a bit of it lately on hemp and CBD.

Earlier this week, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan announced his support to end federal cannabidiol (“CBD”) prohibition and expressed strong support for the uses of industrial hemp. To view the video of Ryan’s comments, go here at the 21:15 mark.

For any newbies out there, CBD is one of the many chemical compounds in a class called “cannabinoids” that naturally occur in cannabis plants. “[CBD] has proven to work,” Ryan said, specifying that it “helps reduce seizures.” Indeed, the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) approved Epidiolex back in August, which is G.W. Pharma’s oral CBD solution for the treatment of seizure associated with Lennox-Gastraut and Dravet syndrome. The FDA approval prompted the Drug Enforcement Administration to reschedule all FDA-approved drugs containing cannabis-derived CBD with no more than 0.1 percent THC under Schedule V of the Controlled Substance Act (“CSA”).

The Speaker, who is not running for reelection and is retiring from Congress at the end of the year, shared that his mother-in-law used a synthetic form of cannabinoids when she was dying from melanoma and ovarian cancer.

Ryan also jumped on the opportunity to speak in favor of industrial hemp when responding to a medical marijuana question from a rally attendee who husband had succumbed to cancer. “And by the way, there’s a lot of industrial uses for hemp that I understand from talking to Mitch McConnell is a big deal to Kentucky agriculture,” he said. “And we’re all in favor of that as well.” Ryan is not going as far as John Boehner, a recent House Speaker who is currently sitting on an advisory board for a for-profit marijuana company, but his take is welcome news to us.

The Speaker’s endorsement of industrial hemp comes at a decisive time. As we previously discussed, Congressional leaders are still attempting to reconcile the House and the Senate versions of the 2018 Farm Bill. The Senate version, which was introduced and championed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, would legalize hemp by removing the crop from the CSA definition of marijuana. The House version, however, is silent on this issue, and thus would afford meager protection for the crop. With Paul Ryan’s public support for ending federal CBD prohibition, however, it seems more likely that the House would approve the hemp language found in the Senate bill.

This is not the first time that Ryan has expressed support for the legalization of CBD and industrial hemp. Back in 2015, the speaker co-sponsored a bill with Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA) that sought to remove industrial hemp and CBD-infused products containing less than 0.3 percent THC from the definition of marijuana under the CSA.

It is still important to note, however, that the Speaker’s endorsement of CBD does not extend to the full legalization of marijuana, even for medical uses. “There’s no THC in that oil. That is not medical marijuana,” he declared. But of course, Ryan’s statement is inaccurate given that most CBD products contain small amounts of the psychoactive cannabis compound.

Nonetheless, proponents of industrial hemp and CBD should be pleased by this latest and encouraging development. The public support for the legalization of the crop and of marijuana’s non-psychoactive cousin by one of the most powerful Congressional leaders reveals a shift in the minds of conservatives and suggests the likely passage of the much anticipated 2018 Farm Bill. Stay tuned!

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Stiffed Drinks: CBD-Infused Alcoholic Beverages Banned in California

CBD alcohol california
Mint is still fine; CBD, not so much.

A few months ago, I spoke to a reporter from Quartz about cannabidiol (CBD). She told me that a local cafe was offering a CBD-infused latte and that it piqued her interest for a story. Her local baristas were not alone as numerous bars, restaurants, and cafes across the country have been experimenting with CBD-infused beverages. However, as with all things CBD, the regulatory framework is rapidly changing. If you’re a business owner looking to add a CBD beverage to the menu, it’s important to carefully consider state and local law.

That brings us to California. California is an excellent case study when it comes to CBD. The Golden State has a long history with cannabis, as it was the first state to create an affirmative defense for the medical use of marijuana in 1996. In 2016, California voters approved of recreational marijuana. California has also approved of an industrial hemp pilot program under the 2014 Farm Bill, but the program has been mostly dormant because the state’s laws and regulations make it nearly impossible to legally obtain hemp seeds. In addition, and perhaps most importantly when it comes to CBD, California has a propensity to regulate just about everything under the Sun.

Cue the California Department of Public Health’s (CDPH) infamous FAQs. As we wrote back in July, these FAQs stated that CDPH was banning the inclusion of hemp-derived CBD as a food, food ingredient, food additive, or dietary supplement. California’s Health and Safety Code defines food to include beverages meaning that CBD is not allowed in beverages of any kind. California’s Alcoholic Beverage Control (“ABC”) issued its own FAQs which stated that licensees could not serve alcoholic beverages mixed with cannabis, even if the licensee was using CBD. ABC cited to CDPH’s FAQs to prohibit the use of hemp-derived CBD.

The FAQs are examples of CDPH and ABC using policy statements to enact what feels like a new law or regulation. At the state level, laws are passed by both branches of a state legislature and signed into effect by the Governor. Laws establish requirements or prohibitions. In turn, regulations are issued by agencies to clarify their interpretation of a law and how a law will be implemented. Like laws, regulations also impose requirements or prohibitions. When an agency issues a new regulation, there are procedural requirements such as a public comment period where stakeholders can voice concerns over proposed regulations. Similarly, when the legislature passes a new law, lawmakers hold public hearings. These procedural requirements provide for transparency.

Agencies also can issue guidance or other policy statements to clarify how an agency understands and implements existing laws and regulations. Generally speaking, guidance and other policy statements are not mandates but rather are an expression by the agency of a suggested or recommended action. Agencies are not generally required to provide the public with a notice and comment period before issuing a policy statement because those statements shouldn’t establish requirements or prohibitions.

When it comes to CBD-infused products, the outright prohibition in California is stated in the CDPH’s policy statement. There is no law or regulation that specifically prohibits using industrial hemp derived CBD as a food additive but CDPH interprets its governing rules and regulations to prohibit CBD in food or drinks.

Alternatively, ABC’s guidance prohibiting the use of CBD in alcoholic beverages has been enacted into California law. Recently, Governor Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 2914 (the “Bill”) prohibiting alcoholic beverage licensees, like bars and liquor stores, from providing hemp-derived CBD cocktails. The Bill’s purpose is summed up as follows:

This bill would prohibit an alcoholic beverage licensee from, at its licensed premises, selling, offering, or providing cannabis or cannabis products, including an alcoholic beverage that contains cannabis or cannabis products, and would provide that no alcoholic beverage shall be manufactured, sold, or offered for sale if it contains tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabinoids, regardless of source.”

That last phrase, “regardless of source,” encompasses cannabinoids like CBD even if it was derived from industrial hemp.

California has codified the prohibition of CBD-infused alcoholic beverages. The similar prohibition on CBD in non-alcoholic beverages and other consumable products is not codified in a law or regulation. In that sense, the latter prohibition would be easier to reverse. That said, CDPH’s guidance is powerful as agencies are given broad deference when interpreting their own regulations, so if CDPH changes that guidance, it will likely be because it wants to or because the legislature writes a law to expressly allow CBD in non-alcoholic beverages and other consumables. It will not be the result of a private party lawsuit.

The idea of offering a CBD-infused cocktail in California is a non-starter. If you are hoping to enjoy a CBD cocktail, you’ll have to forgo California and book a flight east. CNBC reports a New York bar is experimenting with CBD cocktails. Perhaps New York regulators will take a different approach from their California counterparts. Time will tell.

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The Perplexing State of Industrial Hemp and Hemp-Derived CBD Sales in California

Hemp and Hemp-CBD in California is wild right now.

As readers of this blog know, California is on its way to developing robust laws governing the sale (and all other aspects) of cannabis and cannabis products. So, it’s somewhat surprising that California’s laws concerning the sale of industrial hemp and hemp-derived cannabidiol (“hemp-CBD”), to the extent they even exist, are all over the map. And in some cases, selling industrial hemp or hemp-CBD is apparently unlawful, in spite of the fact that it may contain just trace amounts of THC found in California-legal cannabis products and despite the fact that that hemp-CBD is coming from Farm Bill-sanctioned sources.

Our California cannabis lawyers often get asked what the requirements are for selling industrial hemp or hemp-CBD in California. This post tries to explain California’s convoluted regulation of industrial hemp and hemp-CBD.

As a baseline, “Industrial Hemp” is legally defined as parts of the Cannabis sativa L. plant, or derivatives of that plant, containing less than .3% THC. The Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (“MAUCRSA”) specifically defines “Cannabis” to exclude Industrial Hemp. The Health and Safety Code echoes this sentiment, and also states that the California Department of Food and Agriculture (“DFA”) exclusively regulates industrial hemp.

The Food and Agriculture Code, which the DFA enforces and interprets, includes some provisions regarding industrial hemp—but notably that Code contains nothing concerning its sale. We have been monitoring (here and here) California’s SB-1409, which modifies these parts of the Food and Agriculture Code, but again there are no requirements concerning actual sales (for what it’s worth, you can also read more about the expiration of the federal 2014 Farm Bill here). Even the DFA has recognized that “California law does not currently provide any requirements for the manufacturing, processing, or selling of non-food industrial hemp or hemp products.”

The message here then is that there are no regulations governing the sale of industrial hemp or hemp-derived CBD. There are, however, some other pretty important requirements at the legislative, policy, and even local levels that could affect hemp and hemp-CBD businesses across the state:

  • Legislation: California recently passed legislation banning licensed cannabis or alcoholic beverage companies from selling alcoholic beverages that contain cannabis, or cannabinoids derived from industrial hemp. Stay tuned for in-depth coverage of that in another post.
  • Policy: Over the summer, the California Department of Public Health’s Food and Drug Branch (“FDB”) drafted a FAQ taking the position that “the use of industrial hemp as the source of CBD to be added to food products is prohibited.” We don’t yet know what FDB’s enforcement measures will look like, if anything, but it’s pretty clear what its position is on hemp-CBD in food and drinks.
  • Local Level: This is where things get dicey. As anyone familiar with cannabis law knows, every one of the hundreds of cities and counties in California has different laws on cannabis licensing. One common requirement for any business in most municipalities is to have a form of business license—and this may be an area in which local jurisdictions create specific industrial hemp and hemp-CBD requirements. For example, the Department of Cannabis Regulation (“DCR”) within the City of Los Angeles recently published an “attestation” form that hemp business owners must sign under penalty of perjury, certifying that their hemp-CBD or industrial hemp products meet the definitions of the Health and Safety Code, and that those products are not “cannabis”. This is now apparently a requirement for Los Angeles hemp businesses that wish to obtain local business licenses, and it looks like that’s the only hemp/hemp-CBD “regulation” that the City of Los Angeles currently has on the books.

Overall, the bottom line is that we still lack the critical legal infrastructure for industrial hemp and hemp-CBD in California. We don’t know how the state or localities will enforce the FDB FAQ. We don’t know how the state will regulate hemp-CBD sales. We don’t know how the locals will regulate hemp-CBD businesses, if at all.

So, stay tuned, as we’ll be sure to write about new California hemp and hemp-CBD laws as they come.

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California Passes Industrial Hemp Legislation

california industrial hemp
For the most part, anyway.

We’ve been closely following the trajectory of SB 1409 and on September 30, 2018, Governor Brown signed the bill which will go into effect on January 1, 2019. This legislation is a huge step for California cannabis, in that it will add an industrial hemp pilot program to the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s registration system.

Currently, California law regulates the cultivation of industrial hemp, and specifies certain procedures and requirements on cultivators, not including an established agricultural research institution. Existing law defines “industrial hemp,” via the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, as a fiber or oilseed crop, or both, that is limited to the non-psychoactive types of the plant Cannabis sativa L. and the seed produced from that plant.

Existing California law also requires that industrial hemp only be grown by those on the list of approved hemp seed cultivars. That list includes only hemp seed cultivars certified on or before January 1, 2013. Industrial hemp may only be grown as a densely planted fiber or oilseed crop, or both, in minimum acreages. Growers of industrial hemp and seed breeders must register with the county agricultural commissioner and pay a registration and/or renewal fee.

SB 1409 deletes the exclusionary requirement that industrial hemp seed cultivars be certified on or before January 1, 2013. Additionally, “industrial hemp” will no longer be defined restrictively in the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act as a fiber or oilseed crop, and the bill deletes the requirement that industrial hemp be grown as a fiber or oilseed crop, or both. We initially presumed this would allow cultivators to harvest hemp for CBD derivation, and related use, but given the recent FAQ issued by the California Department of Public Health effectively banning the sale of CBD food products, how hemp-derived CBD in California will be regulated in the future remains to be seen. We are certain this is an issue that will be taken up by the state during the rule-making process.

SB 1409 also authorizes the state Department of Food and Agriculture to carry out, pursuant to the federal Agricultural Act of 2014, an agricultural pilot program for industrial hemp. Twinning a state-sanctioned pilot program with licensed, private cultivation is a model that has worked well in other states, like Colorado and Oregon. Given the recent expiration of the 2014 Farm Bill prior to passage of the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, however, it remains to be seen how new hemp pilot programs will be viewed and treated by the federal government. Our hope is that Congress will resolve its differences and enact the Hemp Farming Act of 2018 before the end of the year, or at least before California is able to build out and implement its own regulatory system.

Some other provisions included in SB 1409 include detailed requirements for sampling and laboratory testing of industrial hemp. The bill provides new time frames for sampling of industrial hemp and destruction of hemp that exceeds the 0.3% THC limit. Also of note, and perhaps unfortunately, the bill adds a provision to the Food and Agricultural Code giving local jurisdictions the ability to ban industrial hemp cultivation in limited circumstances:

A city of county may, upon a finding that pollen adrift from industrial hemp crops may pose a threat to licensed cannabis cultivators permitted by the city or county, prohibit growers from conducting, or otherwise limit growers’ conduct of, industrial hemp cultivation in the city or county by local ordinance, regardless of whether growers meet, or are exempt from, requirements for registration pursuant to this division or any other law.”

We’ve seen recent litigation on this issue in Oregon, so perhaps the state is trying to insulate its licensees from similar outcomes.

As stated above, we’ll be very interested to see how (and if) regulators tackle the issue of industrial hemp-derived CBD in California as they develop the new regulatory framework for hemp. In the meantime, if you are unfamiliar with the current legal status of hemp-derived CBD food products in California, we recommend reading the CDPH’s FAQ and checking out our post on the topic here. We’ll continue to monitor rule development now that the bill has passed and all hemp-related developments in California closely.

For more on industrial hemp generally (including CBD), check out our wealth of archived posts here.

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Hemp Testing

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