Select Page

Author: admin

California Cannabis: Industrial Hemp Regulation Moves Ahead

hemp california cannabis
Coming soon?

Last week, California’s industrial hemp bill, SB 1409, received a unanimous passing vote from committee. We last wrote about SB 1409 in March, and the legislation has undergone some changes, warranting a new summary of what has been proposed.

Currently, California law regulates the cultivation of industrial hemp, and specifies certain procedures and requirements on cultivators, not including an established agricultural research institution. Existing law defines “industrial hemp,” via the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, as a fiber or oilseed crop, or both, that is limited to the non-psychoactive types of the plant Cannabis sativa L. and the seed produced from that plant.

Existing California law also requires that industrial hemp only be grown by those on the list of approved hemp seed cultivars. That list includes only hemp seed cultivars certified on or before January 1, 2013. Industrial hemp may only be grown as a densely planted fiber or oilseed crop, or both, in minimum acreages. Growers of industrial hemp and seed breeders must register with the county agricultural commissioner and pay a registration and/or renewal fee.

SB 1409 proposes to delete the exclusionary requirement that industrial hemp seed cultivars be certified on or before January 1, 2013. Additionally, “industrial hemp” would no longer be defined restrictively in the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act as a fiber or oilseed crop, and the bill would delete the requirement that industrial hemp be grown as a fiber or oilseed crop, or both. We initially presumed this would allow cultivators to harvest hemp for CBD derivation, and related use, but given the recent FAQ issued by the California Department of Public Health effectively banning the sale of CBD food products, how hemp-derived CBD in California will be regulated in the future remains to be seen.

SB 1409 would also authorize the state Department of Food and Agriculture to carry out, pursuant to the federal Agricultural Act of 2014, an agricultural pilot program for industrial hemp. Twinning a state-sanctioned pilot program with licensed, private cultivation is a model that has worked well in other states, like Colorado and Oregon.

Since its last incarnation, some other provisions have been added to beef up SB 1409, including more detailed requirements for sampling and laboratory testing of industrial hemp. The bill will provide new time frames for sampling of industrial hemp and destruction of hemp that exceeds the 0.3% THC limit.

Also of note, and sort of unfortunately, the bill adds a provision to the Food and Agricultural Code giving local jurisdictions the ability to ban industrial hemp cultivation in limited circumstances:

“A city of county may, upon a finding that pollen adrift from industrial hemp crops may pose a threat to licensed cannabis cultivators permitted by the city or county, prohibit growers from conducting, or otherwise limit growers’ conduct of, industrial hemp cultivation in the city or county by local ordinance, regardless of whether growers meet, or are exempt from, requirements for registration pursuant to this division or any other law.”

As stated above, we’ll be very interested to see how the issue of industrial hemp-derived CBD plays out in California, and whether the passage of SB 1409 would do anything to change it. In the meantime, if you are unfamiliar with the current legal status of hemp-derived CBD food products in California, we recommend reading the CDPH’s FAQ and checking out our post on the topic here. We’ll continue to monitor this bill and all hemp-related developments in California closely.

For more on industrial hemp generally (including CBD), check out our wealth of archived posts here.

Read More

Heads Up! Oregon Has New Cannabis Labeling and Packaging Rules

marijuana cannabis Oregon packaging labeling
Don’t worry, your favorite symbol isn’t going anywhere.

Last year, the Oregon Legislature passed Senate Bill 1057, which transferred cannabis labeling authority from the Oregon Health Authority (“OHA”) to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (“OLCC”). The new rules, which became operational on August 15, 2018, merged the OHA rules with those of the OLCC and further clarified the labeling and packaging regulations. Overall, this is a good thing.

Although the new regulations do not drastically differ from those under the old rules, OLCC licensees (i.e., recreational marijuana producers, processors, wholesalers, and retailers, including those processing and selling hemp products) and OHA registrants (i.e., medical marijuana growers, processors, and retailers) will need to familiarize themselves with these revisions and update their labels to be in compliance by April 1, 2019. At that point, all marijuana items transferred to dispensaries or retail shops will have to be packaged and labelled pursuant to the new rules.

To comply with these new standards, existing licensees will need to resubmit their label and package applications for pre-approval before the April 1, 2019 deadline. Also note that all new label and package applications submitted for pre-approval as of August 15th will be reviewed and evaluated by the OLCC under these rules. Typically, pre-approval takes 2 to 4 weeks but can occasionally last longer.

The most noticeable changes and clarifications to the labeling and packaging rules are as follows:

  • The word “consumer” now excludes “a patient or designated caregiver.”
  • The new rules explicitly provide that they apply to marijuana items and industrial hemp products sold to consumers, patients, or designated primary caregivers. Consequently, the new rules require a clear label of whether the product contains marijuana or hemp. If it contains both, then the label must identify the item as a marijuana item.
  • Marijuana items and industrial hemp products must be packaged in a container that is “resealable and continually child-resistant.”
  • If the product is an industrial hemp commodity or product processed by a licensee, the principal display must include the hemp symbol in place of the marijuana universal symbol.
  • The new rules define “added substances” to mean “any additional component or ingredient added to usable marijuana, cannabinoid concentrate or cannabinoid extract during or after processing that is present in the final product. This includes added flavors, terpenes, and any substances used to change viscosity or consistency of the cannabinoid product.”
  • The new rules no longer provide a distinction for “flag labels.” Instead, the new regulations refer to “small container labels and “tiny container labels,” which have their own requirements.
  • The new rules no longer require test batch numbers on labels.
  • The new rules replaced the font size and font type requirements (at least 8 point Times New Roman, Helvetica, or Arial font) with a provision that the labels display a “legible font that is easy to read and contrasts sufficient with the background and is at least 1/16th of an inch in height based on the uppercase ‘K’.”
  • The new rules rephrased some of the warning requirements to read as follows: “Do not drive a motor vehicle while under the influence of marijuana.” And, “Keep out of reach of children.” (You are no longer required to mention animals.)

Note that while labels must comply with the new rules by April 1, 2019, marijuana items on dispensary or retail shelves that meet old packaging and labeling rules under the OHA will be allowed for sale until December 31, 2019. However, as of January 1, 2020, all marijuana items will have to meet the OLCC packaging and labeling rules and all items with labels that meet the pre-August 15, 2018 rules will be removed from the market.

So, if you are licensed to produce, process or sell marijuana or industrial hemp products in Oregon be sure to review the new rules now to have ample time to update your labels by the April 1, 2019 deadline and avoid any civil penalty, which can go up to $500 per day—Ouch!

Read More

ICRS 2018: Report from Leiden (Part 2)

During the first week of July 2018, five-hundred-and-thirty-five delegates from five continents met at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands for the 28th annual symposium of the International Cannabinoid Research Society (ICRS). The four-day conference showcased recent scientific discoveries about cannabis components and various ways of targeting the endocannabinoid system to improve health outcomes.

Read More

ICRS 2018: CBD Shines in Leiden (Part 1)

ICRS Flyer

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a common – and potentially fatal – complication following bone marrow and solid organ transplants. This life threatening condition can also occur after a patient receives a blood transfusion or other forms of transplanted tissue from a genetically different person.

Read More

Hemp Testing

Altitude Consulting is not only a hemp testing laboratory, but an organization trusted to consult within the industry. Home growers and commercial farms around the world recognize that EPA based methodologies assure the most accurate and consistent data. Give us a call or bring us a hemp potency, residual solvent or terpene profile sample and see the difference.

Altitude Consulting
Denver’s most effective cannabis testing company.