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Five Key Documents Necessary to Understand Industrial Hemp Law

industrial hemp cannabis

On Thursday, November 30, I’ll be speaking at a presentation hosted by the Seminar Group titled, “The Business of Marijuana in Washington State.” In preparation for this event, I’ve put together a list of materials that I think are vital to understanding the law on hemp-derived CBD (Hemp-CBD). Below is a list of statutes, cases, and other authority that frames the legal status of Hemp-CBD.

The Agricultural Act Of 2014 Section 7606 (the 2014 Farm Bill). Any analysis of US policy regarding hemp must the begin with the 2014 Farm Bill. Section 7606 of the 2014 Farm Bill is the starting point of the country’s rapidly expanding Hemp-CBD industry. The 2014 Farm Bill allows states to implement agricultural pilot programs overseeing the cultivation of industrial hemp. Industrial hemp is defined as the cannabis plant with less than .3% THC on a dry weight basis. States that have implemented an agricultural pilot programs are then authorized to issue licenses or permits to individuals and entities who can then cultivate industrial hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill requires a research component. What constitutes research is not defined within the “four corners” of the 2014 Farm Bill. Some states, such as Colorado, Kentucky, and Oregon, have interpreted the 2014 Farm Bill liberally, allowing the commercial sale and distribution of industrial hemp and industrial hemp products, such as hemp-CBD.

Statement of Principles on Industrial Hemp (the Statement). In 2016, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), issued the Statement. The stated goal of this guidance document is to provide clarity as to how federal law applies to activities associated with industrial hemp, grown pursuant to the 2014 Farm Bill. The DEA interpreted the 2014 Farm Bill taken narrowly as the Statement indicates that the general commercial sale of industrial hemp is not permitted except for “marketing research” conducted by institutions of higher education or state departments of agriculture. The DEA also interprets the 2014 Farm Bill to prohibit the interstate transfer of industrial hemp. The DEA has not enforced the Statement robustly. For the most part, the commercial sale of industrial hemp and Hemp-CBD and the interstate transfer of industrial have been unimpeded by the DEA.

The Agricultural Appropriation Act of 2018, Section 537. One of the major reasons that the DEA has not followed up on the Statement, is that Congress has exercised its “power of the purse” to prevent the DEA from using federal funds to prevent the interstate transfer of industrial hemp or the commercial sale of industrial hemp. This was first enacted in 2017 and recently was renewed to run through December 9, 2018.

Hemp Indus. Ass’n v. U.S. Drug Enf’t Admin., 720 Fed. Appx. 886 (9th Cir. 2018). This case, decided by the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, was brought by the Hemp Industry Association in response to the DEA’s “marijuana extract rule.”

The rule established a new drug code specifically for marijuana extracts and defined a marijuana extract as any extract containing cannabinoids derived from the cannabis plant. On its face, the rule makes no distinction between industrial hemp and marijuana. Shortly after issuing the rule, the DEA issued a clarifying statement that said that the rule only applied to derivative of marijuana, and that it would not make any extracts that were otherwise legal under US law illegal.

HIA was unsuccessful in the sense that the Ninth Circuit upheld the rule, dismissing the HIA’s challenges on procedural grounds. However, the DEA’s rule was left largely toothless by the time the Court issued its memorandum as the DEA had already walked back the rule through its clarification. Additionally, the Court stated that the 2014 Farm Bill preempted the Controlled Substances Act (CSA), meaning that when the CSA and 2014 Farm Bill conflict, the 2014 Farm Bill prevails. This preemption interpretation does not set precedent, as the memorandum is non-binding. It does, however, give credence to the argument that the 2014 Farm Bill preempts the CSA.

Hemp Farming Act of 2018. The Hemp Farming Act of 2018 was introduced by Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell. Mitch McConnell hails from the state of Kentucky, which has become a major player in industrial hemp. The Hemp Farming Act is much more detailed than the 2014 2014 Farm Bill. It explicitly removes industrial hemp and derivatives from industrial hemp, including CBD, from the CSA. It also provides a more robust regulatory framework’s for states to implement industrial hemp programs.

The Hemp Farming Act was adopted in its entirety in the Senate version of the 2018 Farm Bill. The house version of the 2018 Farm Bill did not include the Hemp Farming Act. Before the 2018 Farm Bill can be enacted into federal law, both houses of Congress must agree on the language of the Bill. Recently, McConnell guaranteed that the hemp provisions included in the Senate Bill would make the final cut. If that’s true, then as early as next year we will see a much more thoughtful (and discernible!) federal policy on industrial hemp.

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Senate Majority Leader Guarantees Industrial Hemp Legalization

industrial hemp cannabis farm bill

Just two weeks after Speaker of the House Paul Ryan expressed public support for the legalization of industrial hemp, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is now guaranteeing that the 2018 Farm Bill will include the industrial hemp legalization provision once the House and the Senate solve their difference regarding this issue.

If there’s a Farm Bill, it’ll be in there, I guarantee that,” McConnell told reporters last Friday.

(To watch McConnell’s hemp legalization guarantee, go to 13:15 into this video clip).

As we have discussed at length, the House and the Senate versions of the bill differ in that the House version is silent on the legalization of industrial hemp whereas the Senate version, which was introduced by the Senate Majority Leader himself, would remove the crop from the definition of “marijuana” under the Controlled Substance Act, and instead treat hemp like a standard agricultural crop. Indeed, although industrial hemp and marijuana are the same species, hemp contains a negligible amount of tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”), the psychoactive compound that gives its users a high.

In justifying his support of the legalization of the crop, McConnell stressed the immense value and versatility of industrial hemp. In addition, McConnell declared that he became aware of the international implications of hemp legalization during his visits of hemp processors this past year and explained that major foreign investors have expressed interest in the hemp business, signaling the crop’s tremendous potential.

I don’t want to overstate this—I don’t know if it’s going to be the next tobacco or not—but I do think it has a lot of potential. And as all of you already know, in terms of food and medicine but also car parts…it’s an extraordinary plant.”

According to the Senate Majority Leader, once legalized, industrial hemp will be “lightly regulated” by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In addition, there will be no more federal involvement except for the issuance of crop insurances to hemp farmers—which is one of the most significant provisions included in the Senate version of the bill. Instead, industrial hemp would be regulated by local law enforcement, pursuant to the state program under which hemp farmers would be registered.

Although McConnell acknowledged that a provision pertaining to work requirements for food stamp recipients had caused delays in the enactment of the 2018 Farm Bill, he declared that the enactment of the bill will be one of his top priorities when Congress reconvenes for a lame-duck session.

The continuing public support for the legalization of industrial hemp by conservative Congressional leaders strongly suggests that the enactment of the 2018 Farm Bill is imminent, which is fantastic news!

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Washington State Regulates CBD Additives as Used in Marijuana Products

cannabis washington lcb marijuana

Earlier this year, the Washington Legislature passed House Bill 2334 (the “Bill”) into law. The Bill allows licensed marijuana producers and processors to use cannabidiol (CBD) from a source not licensed by the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB). The Bill defines a “CBD product” as “any product containing or consisting of cannabidiol” and would permit the use of CBD products from unlicensed sources so long as the CBD product has a THC level of 0.3 percent or less on a dry weight basis and has been lab tested. The Bill essentially allows Washington processors to add CBD from industrial hemp derived in other states into Washington marijuana products.

Washington’s regulated cannabis market is a closed loop that works on the principle that no marijuana comes in and none goes out. Everything sold in a licensed retail store is grown by licensed producer and processed into products like oils and edible by a licensed processor.

Start ramping up ahead of December 1.

On October 31, the LCB enacted new regulations in light of the Bill. These new rules impose some additional requirements and restrictions with regards to CBD derived from sources outside of Washington’s framework. The LCB will not allow the addition of CBD to useable marijuana flower. That means CBD additives will be limited to edibles, oils, tinctures, and other products that are derived from marijuana. Licensees will have to enter CBD products into the LCB’s traceability system, keep the records up-to-date, and the additives labeled. And licensees must also keep CBD additives quarantined from other marijuana until the CBD additives have gone through lab testing.

The LCB already requires that all marijuana and marijuana products undergo lab testing. WAC 314-55-102. CBD additives will go through additional testing under these new regulations. CBD additives that do not pass testing cannot be added to marijuana products.

In addition to the THC threshold, outside CBD must be tested for contaminants and toxins by the same accredited labs that test other marijuana and marijuana products in Washington. Licensees must submit samples of CBD additives to accredited labs. The samples must be representative of the entire product and must be one percent of the product as packaged by the manufacturer but no less that two grams. The samples must be collected in a sanitary manner, meaning the person collecting the samples must wash her hands, wear gloves, and use sanitary utensils and storage devices. Samples must be labeled with an unique identifier number, the trade name of the lab receiving the sample, the license number and tradename of the licensee, the date the sample was collected and the weight of the sample.

The CBD additives must be tested for THC to ensure that the product contains less than 0.3 percent. The additives are also tested to determine/verify the levels of THC and CBD. CBD additives must be tested for pesticides, heavy metals, residual solvents, microbiological matter, and mycotoxin.

For any questions on these new rules, give us a call. The new rules take effect December 1, 2018.

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Cannabidiol and Epilepsy Meta-Analysis

How often have we heard, “More research is needed,” from those who would prefer to see no change in policies that should be informed by science? From climate denial to cannabis prohibition, the demand for absolute scientific certainty is a call for inaction.

It begs the question: When is there “enough” research?

How about not enough to eliminate all uncertainties, but enough to recommend medical treatment or change policy?

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Hemp Testing

Altitude Consulting is not only a hemp testing laboratory, but an organization trusted to consult within the industry. Home growers and commercial farms around the world recognize that EPA based methodologies assure the most accurate and consistent data. Give us a call or bring us a hemp potency, residual solvent or terpene profile sample and see the difference.

Altitude Consulting
Denver’s most effective cannabis testing company.