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Kentucky Hemp Grower Group Reaps $2,000,000 Harvest in 2016

Source: Atalo Holdings Communications

Winchester, Ky. – Atalo Holdings, Inc., a diversified industrial hemp research and production company in Winchester, Ky., announced a $2,000,000 payout to their Growers' Group for the 2016 harvest. “We are pleased to announce payments of $2,000,000 to our growers for hemp grain and CBD production in 2016,” said Atalo Chairman Andrew Graves. “This represents a solid step forward in hemp research and development and offers the potential for positive rural economic development in 2017.”

Ben Furnish is a grain and tobacco farmer who participated in the Atalo Growers' Group. “This was a good year for our hemp grain. Much better than last year with an all around good yield. Atalo's proprietary seed proved to be an improvement, the crop fit in well with our soy bean program and the return on investment was a little better than corn,” said Furnish. Hemp-based foods have emerged as “superfoods” in the health and wellness food category in North American and European markets with a projected compounded annual growth rate of 20% through 2020. This is good news for Kentucky farmers. “Hemp is a unique plant, with so many uses, from fiber to protein, oils and CBD. These multiple uses should make revenue from hemp comparable with tobacco,” Furnish said.

Dave Spalding is the Growers' representative for Atalo Holdings. According to Spalding, “In 2016, we had 58 growers and 2,466 acres approved for hemp production, making us one of the largest permitted hemp companies in the US. At our Hemp Research Campus, the mission is to provide leadership and value through research, development and commercialization of industrial hemp. For this harvest, 410 acres were for CBD, which we are processing, and 755 acres were for grain and seed replication. Hemp is demonstrating great potential as a sustainable source of quality agricultural protein and gross returns from CBD production appear to be at least comparable to if not better than gross returns from tobacco on a per acre basis.”

Robert Eads is a tobacco farmer who sees hemp as a potential alternative crop. “I had a very good year and an excellent return on investment in Atalo's CBD program,” said Eads. “They helped me with seed selection, planting methods, harvesting and drying. All in all I'd say next year's CBD crop will be accomplished with my existing tobacco equipment. With that kind of return on investment, I'm looking forward to next year and an opportunity for improved seed, planting, harvesting and drying techniques. We're all learning and the market looks promising.”

Atalo CEO, William Hilliard, says the market is expanding rapidly. “According to Hemp Business Journal, dispensary sales of CBD products will grow to $1.6 billion in sales by 2020 and SPINS, a leading provider of retail consumer insights, analytics reporting for the Natural, Organic, and Specialty Products Industry, tracked $1,344,646 in sales of products containing CBD as a primary ingredient in the Natural and Specialty Retail channel over the 52-week period ending Aug. 7, 2016.”

“The Hemp Business Journal also estimates that total sales of CBD products in the pet supplement channel will be just shy of $7 million in 2016 and account for about 6 percent of hemp-based CBD product sales.” These economic indicators coupled with the 2016 harvest results give us strong momentum going into the 2017 season, Hilliard said.”

Atalo Holdings, Inc. and subsidiary companies Super Food Processing, KentuckyCBD and Kentucky Hemp Seed R&D operate the Hemp Research Campus in Winchester, Kentucky.

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Kentucky Hemp Grower Group Reaps $2,000,000 Harvest in 2016

Source: Atalo Holdings Communications

Winchester, Ky. – Atalo Holdings, Inc., a diversified industrial hemp research and production company in Winchester, Ky., announced a $2,000,000 payout to their Growers' Group for the 2016 harvest. “We are pleased to announce payments of $2,000,000 to our growers for hemp grain and CBD production in 2016,” said Atalo Chairman Andrew Graves. “This represents a solid step forward in hemp research and development and offers the potential for positive rural economic development in 2017.”

Ben Furnish is a grain and tobacco farmer who participated in the Atalo Growers' Group. “This was a good year for our hemp grain. Much better than last year with an all around good yield. Atalo's proprietary seed proved to be an improvement, the crop fit in well with our soy bean program and the return on investment was a little better than corn,” said Furnish. Hemp-based foods have emerged as “superfoods” in the health and wellness food category in North American and European markets with a projected compounded annual growth rate of 20% through 2020. This is good news for Kentucky farmers. “Hemp is a unique plant, with so many uses, from fiber to protein, oils and CBD. These multiple uses should make revenue from hemp comparable with tobacco,” Furnish said.

Dave Spalding is the Growers' representative for Atalo Holdings. According to Spalding, “In 2016, we had 58 growers and 2,466 acres approved for hemp production, making us one of the largest permitted hemp companies in the US. At our Hemp Research Campus, the mission is to provide leadership and value through research, development and commercialization of industrial hemp. For this harvest, 410 acres were for CBD, which we are processing, and 755 acres were for grain and seed replication. Hemp is demonstrating great potential as a sustainable source of quality agricultural protein and gross returns from CBD production appear to be at least comparable to if not better than gross returns from tobacco on a per acre basis.”

Robert Eads is a tobacco farmer who sees hemp as a potential alternative crop. “I had a very good year and an excellent return on investment in Atalo's CBD program,” said Eads. “They helped me with seed selection, planting methods, harvesting and drying. All in all I'd say next year's CBD crop will be accomplished with my existing tobacco equipment. With that kind of return on investment, I'm looking forward to next year and an opportunity for improved seed, planting, harvesting and drying techniques. We're all learning and the market looks promising.”

Atalo CEO, William Hilliard, says the market is expanding rapidly. “According to Hemp Business Journal, dispensary sales of CBD products will grow to $1.6 billion in sales by 2020 and SPINS, a leading provider of retail consumer insights, analytics reporting for the Natural, Organic, and Specialty Products Industry, tracked $1,344,646 in sales of products containing CBD as a primary ingredient in the Natural and Specialty Retail channel over the 52-week period ending Aug. 7, 2016.”

“The Hemp Business Journal also estimates that total sales of CBD products in the pet supplement channel will be just shy of $7 million in 2016 and account for about 6 percent of hemp-based CBD product sales.” These economic indicators coupled with the 2016 harvest results give us strong momentum going into the 2017 season, Hilliard said.”

Atalo Holdings, Inc. and subsidiary companies Super Food Processing, KentuckyCBD and Kentucky Hemp Seed R&D operate the Hemp Research Campus in Winchester, Kentucky.

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Red Cross Meets Green Cross

CannaCraft, Red Cross
A major legal medical marijuana factory in Northern California has become the headquarters of the American Red Cross' relief efforts for tens of thousands of displaced evacuees fleeing the state's historic series of wildfires.
By David Downs On October 17, 2017

From Greenstate.com

A major legal medical marijuana factory in Northern California has become the headquarters of the American Red Cross' relief efforts for tens of thousands of displaced evacuees fleeing the state's historic series of wildfires.

The 140-employee company CannaCraft in Santa Rosa is feeding and hosting 200 Red Cross staff for the next five weeks, said Kial Long, spokeswoman at the company. CannaCraft is providing 12,000 square-feet of office space to be used as the American Red Cross Regional Headquarters for Northern California fire relief.

Cannabis remains a federally banned controlled substance considered as dangerous as heroin. But eight states and Washington D.C. have legalized its over the counter use by adults 21 and over. Twenty-nine states have medical cannabis laws. Some 61 percent of U.S. voters support cannabis legalization and 91 percent support medical access to the pain-relieving botanical drug.

Hosting the Red Cross came out of company discussions about ways to help. After surveying available space and equipment, CannaCraft leaders reached out to the Red Cross and offered office space. The Red Cross sent a project leader over to evaluate the space.

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Red Cross Meets Green Cross

CannaCraft, Red Cross

A major legal medical marijuana factory in Northern California has become the headquarters of the American Red Cross’ relief efforts for tens of thousands of displaced evacuees fleeing the state’s historic series of wildfires.
By David Downs On October 17, 2017

From Greenstate.com

A major legal medical marijuana factory in Northern California has become the headquarters of the American Red Cross’ relief efforts for tens of thousands of displaced evacuees fleeing the state’s historic series of wildfires.

The 140-employee company CannaCraft in Santa Rosa is feeding and hosting 200 Red Cross staff for the next five weeks, said Kial Long, spokeswoman at the company. CannaCraft is providing 12,000 square-feet of office space to be used as the American Red Cross Regional Headquarters for Northern California fire relief.

Cannabis remains a federally banned controlled substance considered as dangerous as heroin. But eight states and Washington D.C. have legalized its over the counter use by adults 21 and over. Twenty-nine states have medical cannabis laws. Some 61 percent of U.S. voters support cannabis legalization and 91 percent support medical access to the pain-relieving botanical drug.

Hosting the Red Cross came out of company discussions about ways to help. After surveying available space and equipment, CannaCraft leaders reached out to the Red Cross and offered office space. The Red Cross sent a project leader over to evaluate the space.

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Fire, Brimstone & Dioxin

Fire and cannabis

Heavy smoke has blanketed the skies in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, poisoning the air to an unprecedented degree and prompting air quality alerts and health advisories throughout the region.
By Adrian Devitt-Lee On October 16, 2017

Toxic Smoke Threatens Cannabis Crop and Public Health
Highlights:
  • Smoke from major fires will contaminate crops in Northern California’s prime cannabis-growing region.
  • Cannabis, a bioaccumulator, will uptake heavy metals from the soil that have deposited on the ground.
  • Analytical labs should test cannabis products for an array of fire-related heavy metals, aromatic hydrocarbons, and dioxins, even those that are not mandated by regulations.

The October firestorms raging in Northern California have incinerated nearly a quarter million acres and displaced more than 100,000 residents. Heavy smoke has blanketed the skies in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, poisoning the air to an unprecedented degree and prompting air quality alerts and health advisories throughout the region.

“We have never recorded higher levels of air pollution in the Bay Area,” said air district spokeswoman Kristine Roselius.

While a limited number of deaths have been reported thus far, the public health impacts of this disaster will be felt for many months to come. This is not a typical wildfire; in Santa Rosa, flames have melted gas pipes, power lines, even a cellphone tower. The blaze has scorched thousands of homes and cars, releasing metals into the air. Rubber, fibreglass, paint, and electrical equipment burn to uncommon and highly dangerous toxins, such as dioxins and other biphenyl compounds.

Poisons contained in the smoke will slowly fall from the air and be absorbed by plants and the watershed, contaminating agricultural crops, including those in the Emerald Triangle, America’s cannabis breadbasket. The timing couldn’t have been worse for cannabis farmers as these fires came at the start of harvest season. Cannabis producers and consumers need to be cautious about the chemicals that could accumulate.

There are three common ways that toxins and carcinogens in smoke can be removed from the atmosphere:

  • Volatile chemicals like formaldehyde and carbon monoxide will dissipate by reacting with trace gasses in the air, perturbing the concentration of ozone and other gasses. When carbon monoxide reacts with oxygen radicals, for example, it converts to carbon dioxide.
  • Hardier chemicals may be removed from the sky by wet deposition, whereby rain pulls pollution out of the atmosphere. But that requires precipitation. And if it rains, highly toxic run-off will pollute the watershed.
  • Other chemicals will simply fall from the sky and deposit onto plants, soil, and other solid surfaces. These compounds include benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and dioxins. The chemicals that settle on cannabis or nearby water and soil can be absorbed by the plant and passed on to the consumer. Cannabis, a bioaccumulator, will uptake heavy metals from the soil that have deposited on the ground.

While these toxins can pose serious health hazards, it is important not to exaggerate harms. Cannabis smoke (even from untainted, organically grown cannabis) also contains carcinogens, but smoking marijuana does not increase the risk of oral and lung cancers—possibly because THC, CBD, and other plant cannabinoids exert a direct anti-tumor action against oral and lung cancer.

Another factor that may mitigate harm from inhaled cannabis smoke is the inhibition of a group of enzymes called CYP1A. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons become more carcinogenic when metabolized by CYP1A enzymes in the body: By inhibiting CYP1A in the lungs, cannabinoids could reduce the activation of these carcinogens.

In cannabis smoke, roughly 0.5% of the plant material converts to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. That is 5000 parts per million by weight (ppm). Carcinogenicity of aromatic hydrocarbons is usually discussed at concentrations on the order of 10 ppm.1 It remains to be seen if toxins deposited by the fires will be greater than the concentrations normally found in cannabis smoke. If not, then this cannabis is likely safe to consume (though it may require a warning under prop 65). To reduce further toxicity, it would be best for people to avoid smoking cannabis tainted by the wildfires: vaporization and ingestion are alternatives.

But consumers should also be aware that extraction processes (including butane, ethanol, and CO2) may concentrate these unwanted chemicals, though this is not precisely known. Cannabis producers and consumers should make sure, if possible, that any lab tests apply to the final product, not just the plant material that was used for extraction.

Accurate testing is paramount. Unfortunately, some cannabis labs have a record of providing results before they have validated their methods and can be certain that their numbers are correct. (Validation involves spiking precise amounts of contaminants into clean cannabis samples to ensure that accurate results are obtained.)

Several fire-generated toxins that may be deposited on cannabis crops—including benzene and toluene—are on the list of regulated solvents that California labs will likely have to quantify in cannabis products as of 2018. In preparation for the upcoming regulations, analytical labs may have already validated methods for detecting these compounds.

But other, less common toxins, such as benzopyrenes and polychlorinated dibenzo dioxins (PCDDs; sometimes simply called dioxins), are not included in the new regulations. Dioxins are particularly important: they are formed when chlorinated plastics burn, such as PVC pipes. One kind of dioxin, which is called TCDD, disrupts endocrine, immune, and reproductive systems as well as fetal development. It is also a carcinogen at larger concentrations. (TCDD was also a contaminant in Agent Orange, a chemical weapon created by Monsanto and used in the Vietnam war.)2

Whether mandated by state regulations or not, cannabis labs should also test for these compounds.3 Thus far, however, cannabis labs have not validated testing procedures for these compounds.

Another concern: helicopters and planes have been dumping tons of fire-repellant in an effort to contain the fires. The fire-repellant used, another Monsanto-designed product called Phos-Chek, may also have adverse health consequences. One of the main constituents of Phos-Chek is ammonium salt. Ammonium is a fertilizer: If absorbed through the plant, it is unlikely to be toxic, but smoking or vaporizing ammonium stuck on cannabis resin should be avoided.4

Project CBD hopes that some lab in California will validate methods and offer tests to detect the major contaminants that result from the wildfires. We expect these will include benzene, toluene, benzopyrenes, and heavy metals, as well as some dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls.

Adrian Devitt-Lee, a Project CBD contributing writer, is a senior research associate with CannaCraft.

Footnotes:

  1. Parts per million is a unit that can cause some confusion. It can mean concentration by weight (ppmw) or by volume (ppmv). When discussing cannabis and lab tests, parts per million is measured in weight: ppmw means microgram of contaminant per gram of cannabis. (A microgram, written µg, is one millionth of a gram.) But when talking about safety data, especially for inhaled compounds, parts per million is usually micrograms of contaminant per liter of air. This makes it much easier to determine the concentration of contaminants in a person’s lung. Since an adult human’s lungs contain about 4-6 liters and a joint weighs about half a gram, ppmv is roughly 10 times larger than ppmw. In other words, the lab test for a contaminant should be no more than 10 times larger than the safety parameter for inhaling that contaminant. This is a rule of thumb, not a definitive statement. See the report in footnote 4 for more information on safety data.
  2. TCDD is pervasive in the environment. It can be found at low concentrations in milk and meat, with beef being the worst offender. This is partly because dioxins are extremely durable compounds—the half life of TCDD is close to 10 years. The average human body has roughly 1-5 parts per trillion dioxin in their fat tissue (that is, 1-5 picograms of dioxin per gram of fat). These levels have been declining greatly since the 1970s.
  3. This list is not finalized. The proposed regulations were repealed after the public comment period by the trailer bill, the bill that merged recreation and medical cannabis regulations. The new regulations have not yet been released.
  4. Inhaling ammonia in cannabis at concentrations below 100 ppm is likely safe. 100 ppm means 100 µg ammonia per g cannabis product. The number is based on the equation described Appendix A of this report by Project CBD. Using the terminology from that document, the STEL for ammonia is 27 µg/L. It is reasonable to assume that children use less than 0.25 grams of cannabis and that adults use less than 1 gram of cannabis in a 15 minute period. This increases the estimates in the document by a factor of four.

Sources

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Target Sold CBD Online: Was it Legal?

BuzzFeed recently reported on Target’s short-lived effort at selling cannabis-based products online. By the end of the day on which the story ran, the major retailer had already removed the product from its website. The Phoenix New Times quoted Target spokesperson Kate Decker as saying, “We started carrying Charlotte’s Web hemp extract items last week on Target.com. After further review, we have decided to remove it from our assortment.” However, the Phoenix New Times reported earlier in September that Target was selling CBD products online. Decker could not confirm exactly when Target started selling CBD. The only certainty is that it ended the same day as BuzzFeed’s article.

The thing is that many online retailers (WalMart, Groupon, and Amazon) sell or have sold CBD online. This is in part likely because of the complex legal status of CBD. The Drug Enforcement Agency’s (“DEA”) stance is that CBD, and other cannabinoids derived from cannabis, are Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”), regardless of their source. Last year the DEA created a rule defining “marihuana extract” as an extract “containing one or more cannabinoids derived from any plant of the genus Cannabis,” as marijuana, a Schedule I controlled substance. Use of “any” means it applies to any derivative of the cannabis plant including, CBD and other cannabinoids found in cannabis. This far-reaching definition, on its face, purports to make parts of the cannabis plant that were seemingly legal illegal.

Setting aside the Rule, there are three scenarios in which cannabis extracts are arguably legal under federal law. The first being when extracts are derived from the “mature stalk” of the cannabis plant because the CSA’s definition of marijuana “does not include the mature stalks of such plant, fiber produced from such stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of such plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom), fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is incapable of germination.” 21 USC § 802(16). The DEA has clarified that the Rule does not include portions of the plant specifically exempt from the CSA’s definition of marijuana but also maintains that products that contain any meaningful amount of CBD can be derived from the mature stalks.

The second scenario is when extracts are derived from an industrial hemp plant lawfully grown in compliance with section 7606 of the 2014 US Farm Bill (“the Farm Bill”). The Farm Bill allows states to enact pilot programs for hemp research making hemp legal in the state’s borders. Hemp cultivated in compliance with a State’s program is expressly legal under the Farm Bill. Extracts from compliant hemp are legal in the State in which they were derived though the sale of these products in other states is not explicitly allowed.

The final scenario is when products are derived from imported hemp. In the early 2000s, two cases out of the Ninth Circuit, Hemp Indus. Ass’n v. DEA, 357 F.3d 1012 (9th Cir. Cal. 2004) and Hemp Indus. Ass’n v. DEA, 333 F.3d 1082 (9th Cir. 2003) determined that the DEA cannot regulate hemp products simply because they contain trace amounts of THC. This is because some portions of the cannabis plant are explicitly outside the scope of the CSA and the DEA was not permitted to expand its scope to encompass all parts the plant. At the time of the ruling, it was illegal to grow hemp so it only applied to hemp imported from outside the USA. However, its holding could also apply to hemp grown pursuant to the Farm Bill. In other words, marijuana extracts from non-psychoactive (industrial) hemp with only trace amounts (or less) of naturally occurring THC are permitted under the Ninth Circuit’s ruling.

The Hemp Industries Association has sued the DEA over the “marijuana extract” rule and that case is still pending and until it is decided, uncertainty remains as to the legality of CBD products. The DEA may very well lose because the Rule appears to conflict with the Farm Bill and the Hemp Industry cases from the early 2000s. Nonetheless, despite potential legal flaws, the Rule is currently in place and anyone who distributes “marijuana extracts” is a potential target of the DEA. This is likely why online retailers like Target have flirted with selling CBD products online but often end up pulling products.

Read More

Target Sold CBD Online: Was it Legal?

BuzzFeed recently reported on Target’s short-lived effort at selling cannabis-based products online. By the end of the day on which the story ran, the major retailer had already removed the product from its website. The Phoenix New Times quoted Target spokesperson Kate Decker as saying, “We started carrying Charlotte’s Web hemp extract items last week on Target.com. After further review, we have decided to remove it from our assortment.” However, the Phoenix New Times reported earlier in September that Target was selling CBD products online. Decker could not confirm exactly when Target started selling CBD. The only certainty is that it ended the same day as BuzzFeed’s article.

The thing is that many online retailers (WalMart, Groupon, and Amazon) sell or have sold CBD online. This is in part likely because of the complex legal status of CBD. The Drug Enforcement Agency’s (“DEA”) stance is that CBD, and other cannabinoids derived from cannabis, are Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”), regardless of their source. Last year the DEA created a rule defining “marihuana extract” as an extract “containing one or more cannabinoids derived from any plant of the genus Cannabis,” as marijuana, a Schedule I controlled substance. Use of “any” means it applies to any derivative of the cannabis plant including, CBD and other cannabinoids found in cannabis. This far-reaching definition, on its face, purports to make parts of the cannabis plant that were seemingly legal illegal.

Setting aside the Rule, there are three scenarios in which cannabis extracts are arguably legal under federal law. The first being when extracts are derived from the “mature stalk” of the cannabis plant because the CSA’s definition of marijuana “does not include the mature stalks of such plant, fiber produced from such stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of such plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom), fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is incapable of germination.” 21 USC § 802(16). The DEA has clarified that the Rule does not include portions of the plant specifically exempt from the CSA’s definition of marijuana but also maintains that products that contain any meaningful amount of CBD can be derived from the mature stalks.

The second scenario is when extracts are derived from an industrial hemp plant lawfully grown in compliance with section 7606 of the 2014 US Farm Bill (“the Farm Bill”). The Farm Bill allows states to enact pilot programs for hemp research making hemp legal in the state’s borders. Hemp cultivated in compliance with a State’s program is expressly legal under the Farm Bill. Extracts from compliant hemp are legal in the State in which they were derived though the sale of these products in other states is not explicitly allowed.

The final scenario is when products are derived from imported hemp. In the early 2000s, two cases out of the Ninth Circuit, Hemp Indus. Ass’n v. DEA, 357 F.3d 1012 (9th Cir. Cal. 2004) and Hemp Indus. Ass’n v. DEA, 333 F.3d 1082 (9th Cir. 2003) determined that the DEA cannot regulate hemp products simply because they contain trace amounts of THC. This is because some portions of the cannabis plant are explicitly outside the scope of the CSA and the DEA was not permitted to expand its scope to encompass all parts the plant. At the time of the ruling, it was illegal to grow hemp so it only applied to hemp imported from outside the USA. However, its holding could also apply to hemp grown pursuant to the Farm Bill. In other words, marijuana extracts from non-psychoactive (industrial) hemp with only trace amounts (or less) of naturally occurring THC are permitted under the Ninth Circuit’s ruling.

The Hemp Industries Association has sued the DEA over the “marijuana extract” rule and that case is still pending and until it is decided, uncertainty remains as to the legality of CBD products. The DEA may very well lose because the Rule appears to conflict with the Farm Bill and the Hemp Industry cases from the early 2000s. Nonetheless, despite potential legal flaws, the Rule is currently in place and anyone who distributes “marijuana extracts” is a potential target of the DEA. This is likely why online retailers like Target have flirted with selling CBD products online but often end up pulling products.

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Growers Supply joins National Hemp Association

SOUTH WINDSOR, Conn. (September 7th, 2017) – Growers Supply, the manufacturer of GrowSpan Greenhouse Structures, has become a proud member of the National Hemp Association.

Growers Supply announced its support for the NHA and is excited to help hemp growers and the entire industry. The company has nearly four decades of experience designing and building the highest-quality greenhouse structures. With greenhouse specialists and expert consultants on staff, Growers Supply is dedicated to providing hemp growers with the cultivation solutions they need, while also promoting and advancing the entire industry.

“NHA is thrilled to have Growers Supply join our membership” said Erica McBride, the Executive Director of NHA. “It is the support of our valued members that allows us to focus on our prime mission of passing HR3530 (The Industrial Hemp Act of 2017) and building a multi-billion dollar industry.”

Growers Supply is committed to helping the NHA develop the hemp industry, and in recent years, the company has revamped their line of products to better meet the needs of emerging hemp growers. With new greenhouse systems and light deprivation systems, Growers Supply has designed and created a wide range of products to help growers improve their operation’s functionality and profitability.

Growers Supply is eager to work with the NHA to further develop the hemp industry. To find out more, visit Growers Supply’s greenhouse-dedicated website, GrowSpan.com.

For more information on Growers Supply, visit www.growspan.com or call 1.800.476.9715 to speak to a Greenhouse Specialist.

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There is still time to apply for a hemp license in NY

The deadline to apply for a 2018 hemp license in NY has extended until November 22, 2017

New York is cultivating the industrial hemp market and supporting new opportunities to grow this multi-million dollar crop, which is used in the manufacture of an estimated 25,000+ products—from clothing and food to building materials and pharmaceuticals.

https://www.agriculture.ny.gov/PI/Hemp_Program_Application.pdf

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