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Heads Up! Oregon Has New Cannabis Labeling and Packaging Rules

marijuana cannabis Oregon packaging labeling
Don't worry, your favorite symbol isn't going anywhere.

Last year, the Oregon Legislature passed Senate Bill 1057, which transferred cannabis labeling authority from the Oregon Health Authority (“OHA”) to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (“OLCC”). The new rules, which became operational on August 15, 2018, merged the OHA rules with those of the OLCC and further clarified the labeling and packaging regulations. Overall, this is a good thing.

Although the new regulations do not drastically differ from those under the old rules, OLCC licensees (i.e., recreational marijuana producers, processors, wholesalers, and retailers, including those processing and selling hemp products) and OHA registrants (i.e., medical marijuana growers, processors, and retailers) will need to familiarize themselves with these revisions and update their labels to be in compliance by April 1, 2019. At that point, all marijuana items transferred to dispensaries or retail shops will have to be packaged and labelled pursuant to the new rules.

To comply with these new standards, existing licensees will need to resubmit their label and package applications for pre-approval before the April 1, 2019 deadline. Also note that all new label and package applications submitted for pre-approval as of August 15th will be reviewed and evaluated by the OLCC under these rules. Typically, pre-approval takes 2 to 4 weeks but can occasionally last longer.

The most noticeable changes and clarifications to the labeling and packaging rules are as follows:

  • The word “consumer” now excludes “a patient or designated caregiver.”
  • The new rules explicitly provide that they apply to marijuana items and industrial hemp products sold to consumers, patients, or designated primary caregivers. Consequently, the new rules require a clear label of whether the product contains marijuana or hemp. If it contains both, then the label must identify the item as a marijuana item.
  • Marijuana items and industrial hemp products must be packaged in a container that is “resealable and continually child-resistant.”
  • If the product is an industrial hemp commodity or product processed by a licensee, the principal display must include the hemp symbol in place of the marijuana universal symbol.
  • The new rules define “added substances” to mean “any additional component or ingredient added to usable marijuana, cannabinoid concentrate or cannabinoid extract during or after processing that is present in the final product. This includes added flavors, terpenes, and any substances used to change viscosity or consistency of the cannabinoid product.”
  • The new rules no longer provide a distinction for “flag labels.” Instead, the new regulations refer to “small container labels and “tiny container labels,” which have their own requirements.
  • The new rules no longer require test batch numbers on labels.
  • The new rules replaced the font size and font type requirements (at least 8 point Times New Roman, Helvetica, or Arial font) with a provision that the labels display a “legible font that is easy to read and contrasts sufficient with the background and is at least 1/16th of an inch in height based on the uppercase ‘K'.”
  • The new rules rephrased some of the warning requirements to read as follows: “Do not drive a motor vehicle while under the influence of marijuana.” And, “Keep out of reach of children.” (You are no longer required to mention animals.)

Note that while labels must comply with the new rules by April 1, 2019, marijuana items on dispensary or retail shelves that meet old packaging and labeling rules under the OHA will be allowed for sale until December 31, 2019. However, as of January 1, 2020, all marijuana items will have to meet the OLCC packaging and labeling rules and all items with labels that meet the pre-August 15, 2018 rules will be removed from the market.

So, if you are licensed to produce, process or sell marijuana or industrial hemp products in Oregon be sure to review the new rules now to have ample time to update your labels by the April 1, 2019 deadline and avoid any civil penalty, which can go up to $500 per day—Ouch!

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First Asian Hemp Summit next February in Kathmandu

A first-ever Asian Hemp Summit set for Kathmandu, Nepal next year will explore the vast possibilities for industrial hemp across the continent. Nepal-based Shah Hemp Inno-Ventures (SHIV), HempToday and Hempoint, Czech Republic, are organizers of the inaugural event, which is scheduled for Feb. 1-2, 2019 at the Gokarna Forest Resort in Kathmandu.

Signups started this month for the conference, which will primarily focus on the markets of China, India, Nepal, South Korea, Thailand, Mongolia and Japan. Organizers encourage stakeholders from all Asian countries to attend, including regulators, politicians, development agencies, private hemp enthusiasts, environmental groups, retailers & consumers.

Investment opportunities

“Opportunities abound for global players – investment is needed all throughout Asia in every hemp sector and sub-sector,” said Dhiraj K. Shah, a consultant who founded SHIV with his wife Nivedita in 2014. “And there's a lot that can happen cross-border on the continent because of the strong trading traditions and established import-export arrangements among Asian nations.”

World class speakers

Speakers already tentatively confirmed for the Asian Hemp Summit are:

Anar Artur, CEO, HempMongolia
Riki Hiroi, Each Japan
Nivedita & Dhiraj Shah, SHIV, Nepal
Steve Allin, International Hemp Building Association
Paul Benhaim, Elixinol Group Ltd, Australia
Daniel Kruse, HempConsult GmbH, Germany
Hana Gabrielova, Hempoint, Czech Republic
Haile Selassie Tefari, Hemp Service Intl., France
Arne Verhoef, HempHub, South Africa
Morris Beegle, WAFBA & NoCo Hemp Expo, USA
Rick Trojan, Hemp Road Trip, USA.

Early bird signups at $466 run through October 12, 2018; registration after that is $672. Accreditation fees are exclusive of accommodation.

Summit organizers are still accepting sponsorships and applications from additional speakers for the two-day Summit.

The post First Asian Hemp Summit next February in Kathmandu appeared first on HempToday.

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First Asian Hemp Summit next February in Kathmandu

A first-ever Asian Hemp Summit set for Kathmandu, Nepal next year will explore the vast possibilities for industrial hemp across the continent. Nepal-based Shah Hemp Inno-Ventures (SHIV), HempToday and Hempoint, Czech Republic, are organizers of the inaugural event, which is scheduled for Feb. 1-2, 2019 at the Gokarna Forest Resort in Kathmandu.

Signups started this month for the conference, which will primarily focus on the markets of China, India, Nepal, South Korea, Thailand, Mongolia and Japan. Organizers encourage stakeholders from all Asian countries to attend, including regulators, politicians, development agencies, private hemp enthusiasts, environmental groups, retailers & consumers.

Investment opportunities

“Opportunities abound for global players – investment is needed all throughout Asia in every hemp sector and sub-sector,” said Dhiraj K. Shah, a consultant who founded SHIV with his wife Nivedita in 2014. “And there's a lot that can happen cross-border on the continent because of the strong trading traditions and established import-export arrangements among Asian nations.”

World class speakers

Speakers already tentatively confirmed for the Asian Hemp Summit are:

Anar Artur, CEO, HempMongolia
Riki Hiroi, Each Japan
Nivedita & Dhiraj Shah, SHIV, Nepal
Steve Allin, International Hemp Building Association
Paul Benhaim, Elixinol Group Ltd, Australia
Daniel Kruse, HempConsult GmbH, Germany
Hana Gabrielova, Hempoint, Czech Republic
Haile Selassie Tefari, Hemp Service Intl., France
Arne Verhoef, HempHub, South Africa
Morris Beegle, WAFBA & NoCo Hemp Expo, USA
Rick Trojan, Hemp Road Trip, USA.

Early bird signups at $466 run through October 12, 2018; registration after that is $672. Accreditation fees are exclusive of accommodation.

Summit organizers are still accepting sponsorships and applications from additional speakers for the two-day Summit.

The post First Asian Hemp Summit next February in Kathmandu appeared first on HempToday.

Heads Up! Oregon Has New Cannabis Labeling and Packaging Rules

marijuana cannabis Oregon packaging labeling
Don’t worry, your favorite symbol isn’t going anywhere.

Last year, the Oregon Legislature passed Senate Bill 1057, which transferred cannabis labeling authority from the Oregon Health Authority (“OHA”) to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (“OLCC”). The new rules, which became operational on August 15, 2018, merged the OHA rules with those of the OLCC and further clarified the labeling and packaging regulations. Overall, this is a good thing.

Although the new regulations do not drastically differ from those under the old rules, OLCC licensees (i.e., recreational marijuana producers, processors, wholesalers, and retailers, including those processing and selling hemp products) and OHA registrants (i.e., medical marijuana growers, processors, and retailers) will need to familiarize themselves with these revisions and update their labels to be in compliance by April 1, 2019. At that point, all marijuana items transferred to dispensaries or retail shops will have to be packaged and labelled pursuant to the new rules.

To comply with these new standards, existing licensees will need to resubmit their label and package applications for pre-approval before the April 1, 2019 deadline. Also note that all new label and package applications submitted for pre-approval as of August 15th will be reviewed and evaluated by the OLCC under these rules. Typically, pre-approval takes 2 to 4 weeks but can occasionally last longer.

The most noticeable changes and clarifications to the labeling and packaging rules are as follows:

  • The word “consumer” now excludes “a patient or designated caregiver.”
  • The new rules explicitly provide that they apply to marijuana items and industrial hemp products sold to consumers, patients, or designated primary caregivers. Consequently, the new rules require a clear label of whether the product contains marijuana or hemp. If it contains both, then the label must identify the item as a marijuana item.
  • Marijuana items and industrial hemp products must be packaged in a container that is “resealable and continually child-resistant.”
  • If the product is an industrial hemp commodity or product processed by a licensee, the principal display must include the hemp symbol in place of the marijuana universal symbol.
  • The new rules define “added substances” to mean “any additional component or ingredient added to usable marijuana, cannabinoid concentrate or cannabinoid extract during or after processing that is present in the final product. This includes added flavors, terpenes, and any substances used to change viscosity or consistency of the cannabinoid product.”
  • The new rules no longer provide a distinction for “flag labels.” Instead, the new regulations refer to “small container labels and “tiny container labels,” which have their own requirements.
  • The new rules no longer require test batch numbers on labels.
  • The new rules replaced the font size and font type requirements (at least 8 point Times New Roman, Helvetica, or Arial font) with a provision that the labels display a “legible font that is easy to read and contrasts sufficient with the background and is at least 1/16th of an inch in height based on the uppercase ‘K’.”
  • The new rules rephrased some of the warning requirements to read as follows: “Do not drive a motor vehicle while under the influence of marijuana.” And, “Keep out of reach of children.” (You are no longer required to mention animals.)

Note that while labels must comply with the new rules by April 1, 2019, marijuana items on dispensary or retail shelves that meet old packaging and labeling rules under the OHA will be allowed for sale until December 31, 2019. However, as of January 1, 2020, all marijuana items will have to meet the OLCC packaging and labeling rules and all items with labels that meet the pre-August 15, 2018 rules will be removed from the market.

So, if you are licensed to produce, process or sell marijuana or industrial hemp products in Oregon be sure to review the new rules now to have ample time to update your labels by the April 1, 2019 deadline and avoid any civil penalty, which can go up to $500 per day—Ouch!

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ICRS 2018: CBD Shines in Leiden

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a common – and potentially fatal – complication following bone marrow and solid organ transplants. This life threatening condition can also occur after a patient receives a blood transfusion or other forms of transplanted tissue from a genetically different person.

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CBD Webinar: Join Us August 16th at 11am PST!

cannabis hemp CBD
Don’t miss this one!

Cannabidiol (“CBD”) products are suddenly everywhere. But as much as opportunity and possibility have opened in the hemp-derived CBD industry, so too have legal pitfalls and snares that can confuse just about anyone breaking into this new market. When it comes to navigating the trails that are still being blazed, many are left wondering, “Is it legal or not?”

At a time when the popularity of CBD and hemp products meets legalization, the importance of this question cannot be overstated. Unfortunately, the answer is not an easy one. Individuals and companies alike are stepping forward with innovative ideas and using these products in health supplements, topical ointments, and even food and beverages. What they often find at all stages of production (manufacturing, distribution, and marketing), is that the law can be ambiguous and varied, especially when divided by state lines and the unavoidable intersections with federal law.

Our attorneys have been at the forefront of the struggle to effectively interpret and understand these challenging legal circumstances. On August 16th at 11 am PST, Harris Bricken attorneys Daniel Shortt and Alison Malsbury will present a webinar entitled “CBD Legal or Not: How State and Federal Laws Govern the Manufacture, Marketing & Distribution of CBD Products.”

Whether you are an individual or part of a company, working with U.S. or foreign grown products, an attorney or a government official, this webinar will equip you with the knowledge you need to successfully untangle the legal knots that may be preventing you or your clients from realizing the full potential of this industry. Our attorneys will discuss current state and federal laws, marketing do’s and don’ts, trademark protections, and FDA regulations. They will also address audience questions throughout the presentation.

To register, please go here. Move fast, as early bird pricing ends on August 3rd!

In the meantime, for more on CBD law, check out the following:

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Carbonized hemp for energy-storing hempcrete on tap at IHBA Symposium

Hemp researcher and innovator Carl Martel of Carleton University, Ontario, Canada, will explain how carbonized hemp can be used to create energy storing hempcrete during the 8th Annual Symposium of the International Hemp Building Association (IHBA) Oct. 16-17 in Belgium.

Sponsorship and advertising opportunities in HempToday’s Special IHBA Edition

Martel, who has been researching industrial hemp since 2010, is among leading global hemp experts who will give updates on groundbreaking building projects, humanitarian initiatives and the latest developments in hemp-based construction during the event, to be held at Castle Hof Ter Loonst at Kampenhout near Brussels,

Formally trained as a geo-archaeologist, Martel has worked with a number of hemp companies across Canada and Australia. A grain quality post-harvest management systems expert, he is the co-inventor of a grain disinfection system currently deployed in those countries.

Martel’s recent focus has been on value added products from agricultural waste such as carbon foam for insulation, water filtration and desalination, and energy storage.

All-star lineup of speakers

The IHBA Symposium, which is hosted in a different part of the world each year, is led by veteran hemp builder Steve Allin, the Association’s Director. This year’s host and co-organizer is Wolf Jordan & Co, which is based in Brussels and Kalmthout, Belgium.

Other confirmed speakers for this year’s Symposium are: Monika Brümmer, Cannabric, Spain; Liam Donohoe, Dublin Institute of Technology; Pamela Bosch, Highland Hemp House, Washington State, USA; Igor Bogdonavic, the Serbian developer of a hemp decorticator; Henry Valles, who worked on the first hemp home at the Community First Village in Austin, Texas, USA; and Matthew Mead, Hempitecture, Washington State, USA.

The post Carbonized hemp for energy-storing hempcrete on tap at IHBA Symposium appeared first on HempToday.

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Asian edge in the ‘New Green Revolution’: Genetic diversity

By Arne Verhoef | HempToday – In the “New Green Revolution” brought on by the resurgence of Cannabis, Asian hemp, with the most genetic diversity on the planet, has a decided advantage.

The original Green Revolution, also called the Third Agricultural Revolution (1960-c. 1979), brought rapid agricultural advances unparalleled in earlier periods. Agricultural inputs and new technologies helped increase production, but that Revolution’s biggest driving force was the genetic improvement of staple crops – high-yielding varieties developed through selective breeding.

A ‘New Green Revolution’

Ironically, hemp escaped much of this development, handicapped by international narcotics conventions. Now, as the return of the Cannabis plant presents a “New Green Revolution” all its own, hemp is rapidly entering mainstream agriculture worldwide.

As the homeland of Cannabis, no place on Earth has a longer history with hemp than Asia. Cannabis occurs all over the continent, from Afghanistan and Vietnam, to Thailand and the Koreas. In India, there are probably as many hemp varieties as there are languages, while in some parts of China it would seem that every valley has its own unique crop.

A richness of heritage strains

In Mongolia near-wild populations of the plant exist, showcasing a staggering array of traits. Japan, with its long history of hemp use, has feral populations of their heritage strains to remind us of their pre-prohibition Cannabis richness.

Russia, which has maintained a germ-plasm collection of hemp, similarly has a wide range of heritage and feral Cannabis varieties, including so-called “ruderal” plants, auto-flowering, monoecious plants perfect for seed-crop development and the target of decades of unsuccessful eradication by law enforcement.

Early bird signup $466 until Oct. 13, 2018

Intensified production

As part of the global resurgence in hemp cultivation, many Asian countries have either intensified their production – such as China, by a factor of 6; have paved the way for commercial production (India); or are trying to establish a modern-day industry (Mongolia, Japan).

Challenges do exist in Asia – primarily in legal restrictions left over from the days of the global War on Drugs. Misconception and outright ignorance block rational policy-making and the development of hemp in many countries.

Also, worryingly, many Asian countries are eager to copy the globally recognized but arbitrary line that separates “narcotic cannabis” (marijuana) from “non-narcotic” cannabis (hemp), the latter defined as having 0.3% or less THC.

THC-level targets for Asia

Asian countries would be wise to take note of forward-thinking nations elsewhere in the world which are looking at a THC limit of a full 1.0% or higher. They shouldn’t be so quick to go along with rest of world, and can in fact help to lead the industry out of such restrictive thinking by capitalizing on the continent’s genetic diversity.

Japanese hemp is a good example of this potential. Having historically been cultivated for seeds and fiber, it was by hybridizing with Japanese genetics that the United States Department of Agriculture obtained its tallest hemp crop in the early 20th century, reporting that three of these hybrid strains reached heights of between 15 and 19 feet, and yielded longer inter-nodes, and more and better fiber.

But traditional Japanese hemp can contain up to 3.9% THC, making it not viable under any current global standard. However, crossing these high yielding strains with super low THC hemp can certainly result in hemp at 1.5% THC or lower within just a handful of generations. With modern genetic tools even faster. But only if we realise THC content is not a good indicator of agricultural potential, despite what bureaucrats may say.

Before international narcotics laws, hemp was selected not on its THC value, but rather its agricultural traits and adaptability – standards that must set the framework for the industry in the days going forward.

Working the potential

The Chinese government is certainly paying attention to the potential of its crops, and making good use of them in the modernization of its hemp industry. Through international partnerships and government programs, the Chinese are creating new varieties with modern breeding and their extensive genetic resources, to create high-yielding varieties that perform under a diverse array of conditions.

Many valuable traits, like improved yields, improved fiber quality, improved seed oil/protein content, disease resistance and attractive cannabinoid profiles are already being discovered within Asian hemp populations.

In China, ‘It cannot be revealed’

Even China, with its severe drug laws, has often turned a blind eye to some production areas, so that the People’s Republic could rapidly become the world leader in hemp production.

Although the 0.3% THC limit officially applies in many regions, just last year a scientist asked about the extent of Hemp cultivation in China, stated: “It’s a big figure. It cannot be revealed to the public. Many farms are, strictly speaking, illegal under current law and regulations” https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2108347/green-gold-how-china-quietly-grew-cannabis-superpower.

Why are these varieties being grown? Because they are high-quality, high-yielding crops with a long history of cultivation, despite their more “colorful” cannabinoid profile.

Pakistan, Nepal, Mongolia

In Pakistan, they successfully produce quality hemp seed oil from high-yielding but under-domesticated varieties, with an appreciable amount of oil – up to 31.5% – from wild hemp growing in the mountainous regions, and filled with protein comparable to the best of “industrial” (read: low THC) hemp. It’s of course difficult to quantify their yield/hectare, as very rarely have these hemp varieties been grown in strict agricultural trials.

In Nepal they are building houses from shivs produced from their own local Cannabis “wild crop,” and like many others, using the technical fibers in textiles, and hemp oils and extracts in cosmetics.

Mongolian projects are looking at that country’s near-wild Cannabis populations for interesting and valuable traits to establish a thriving hemp industry, while in India they are trialling indigenous varieties from the Kashmir region, showing perfect adaptation to their environments and hopefully responding well to commercialization.

Kickstarting with historic varieties

Though the modern hemp value chain necessitates creating improved varieties, the historic varieties can easily be used to kick-start hemp industries in Asia. Using native landraces is the most logical step in producing well-adapted varieties for local conditions and domestic production.

Collecting these varieties across the continent and establishing well-managed gene banks will be critical to conserving cannabis biodiversity and valuable traits, as Asian industrial hemp takes its rightful place in The New Green (Cannabis!) Revolution.

About the Author
Arne Verhoef, HempHub, South AfricaArne Verhoef is Managing Editor of HempToday. A trained biologist, horticulturist and developer of health products based on CBD hemp and other healing plants, he also manages The Stokvel Collective, a Community Supported Agriculture project in South Africa that seeks to spread regenerative agriculture through grassroots action.

The post Asian edge in the ‘New Green Revolution’: Genetic diversity appeared first on HempToday.

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